Robotic Exploration Probes

jedion357's picture
jedion357
November 19, 2017 - 6:35am
these came up in this thread:
http://www.starfrontiers.us/node/9896

I seem to remember something about Volturnus first being explored by an unmanned probe

I think that a HS 1 hull with an astrogation package, an intended as single use atomic drive- I say single use but that is for this mission- basically its a type A atomic drive with multiple fuel pellets that the robotic AI will use to void jump to the system then land on a planet, despite not getting an overhaul the engine might be used to lift off and land on another planet in the same system.

to continue using existing game tech the probe is controled by a level 5 robotic brain the 1980's envisioned ansewr for AI.

it will have atmo probes and a landing probe (maybe)

it has energy sensors (scanners)

the equiv of the environmentalist tool kit built into it so that little sample collecting robots will bring back samples for testing

finally it will have a subspace radio that it uses to send back data.
I might not be a dralasite, vrusk or yazirian but I do play one in Star Frontiers!
Comments:

KRingway's picture
KRingway
November 26, 2017 - 2:16pm
Yep, as I've said above, it's a mystery as to why calculations take so long. Assuming a computer is also involved, the time to get it all done still seems to be very long. I could undertsand if this was a plot into uncharted space, but ships are travelling along well established routes.

Granted, there are the various vagaries inherent in space travel but as it's so commonplace in SF one wonders why the poor astrogator has to slog through all of the number crunching or whatever it is they have to do. Space, like the sea, is constantly on the move and there may be issues along the route, but that still doesn't explain the time needed to do the plot. Maybe the space lanes don't have sensors dotted along them feeding back real-time information about conditions, and space travel is always therefore a complete shot in the dark every trip.

JCab747's picture
JCab747
November 26, 2017 - 3:58pm
Originally I was for the Alpha Dawn idea of travel time taking one day per light year travelled, until it was pointed out to me that it took quite a while to accelerate up to Void speed.

I don't see why the jump calculations can't be done during the acceleration time... though a longer time need to make a jump would make the storage class a more viable and even understandable travel option.
Joe Cabadas

Shadow Shack's picture
Shadow Shack
November 26, 2017 - 9:00pm
jedion357 wrote:
KRingway wrote:
Page 25 of KH states that (when describing the Plot Interstellar Jumps skill):

For example, an astrogator plotting an 8 light-year jump must spend 80s hours performing calculations before the ship could accelerate to jump speed.



I dont think this contradicts shadow's interpretation

It can be said that if we accelerated to 20 hex/turn he have not accelerated to jump speed which is 1% of C. as long as the calculation are finished before the ship reaches jump speed. Although I now see how you arrived at your interpretation of the rule.

I read that the same way, you can accelerate the ship all you want as long as you don't accelerate to jump velocity before the calculations are finished...doing so simply throws you into a random point when you drop out of the void because the nose wasn't pointed in the proper direction.
No, I'm not overly fond of Zeb's Guide. Nor do I have any qualms in stating why. Tongue out

My SF website

jedion357's picture
jedion357
November 26, 2017 - 9:18pm
Maybe its a dark energy thing and it really takes that long in that by taking that long you actually ensure accuracy so the time is the standard required by convention and law to ensure accuracy and prevent "flying right through a star or bouncing too close to a super nova" there rough time ammounts have been proven to be accurate and so they are followed for safety. The open secret among astrogators is the numbers are arbitrary and you probably can shave a few hours off but most people dont just for safety.
I might not be a dralasite, vrusk or yazirian but I do play one in Star Frontiers!

rattraveller's picture
rattraveller
November 27, 2017 - 4:43am
Quick question are you calculating the time spent in the Void or the entire jump. If just the Void time which I read last night as lasting 3 to 15 seconds, days of calculations really does seem excessive.
Sounds like a great job but where did you say we had to go?

Shadow Shack's picture
Shadow Shack
November 27, 2017 - 7:52am
The entire jump.

Since canon states 3-15 seconds in the void I simply house rule a second for every light year traversed. Beyond that meager time frame it still takes the aforementioned 100 hours of acceleration just to reach jump velocity (five 20hr GST days) and as also mentioned all but two of the AD jump calculations can be made during that accel time (assuming two 'gators working constant ten hour alternating shifts). For those other two the ship can simply alternate between accelerating and decelerating at 1g while the astrogators finish the calculations for the corresponding 11 & 14LY jumps.

Of course there's also the other five 20hr GST days of deceleration on the other end, so it takes a full tenday to complete all but two of those interstellar voyages. As such I need to retract my statement that SF is marginally faster than Traveller, as Traveller mandates a seven 24hr day week for jumping so Traveller is the one that is marginally faster (by 32 hours).
No, I'm not overly fond of Zeb's Guide. Nor do I have any qualms in stating why. Tongue out

My SF website

KRingway's picture
KRingway
November 27, 2017 - 11:50am
Yep still seems as screwy to me as it did in the 80s when I first read KH Wink Maybe astrogators are only allowed to use a pencil, paper and slide rule Foot in mouth

I still think a robot and a computer would be better at the whole thing. If need be, the astrogator would then be the person that makes sure both are in check en-route. If the journey is being made by a probe, this can be done remotely via subspace link.

JCab747's picture
JCab747
November 27, 2017 - 12:23pm
KRingway wrote:
Yep still seems as screwy to me as it did in the 80s when I first read KH Wink Maybe astrogators are only allowed to use a pencil, paper and slide rule Foot in mouth

I still think a robot and a computer would be better at the whole thing. If need be, the astrogator would then be the person that makes sure both are in check en-route. If the journey is being made by a probe, this can be done remotely via subspace link.


Slide rule? Are they that advanced in Star Frontiers? I thought they were still using the abucus and sextants.
Joe Cabadas

rattraveller's picture
rattraveller
November 27, 2017 - 4:24pm
I appreciate this discussion. My own SF universe has several changes from the standard, like I don't use the Rim races but have included their planets. Space travel is not somthing that has been a big part of it so will use all this to figure out how I want to do it, either using KH standard or changing it.

One question if the void trip takes 3-15 seconds but 100 hours to figure, how do you make a quick exit from a system as they descibed in lore about starship battles? Is it watching the attacker coming at you, then a few shots fired at each other and then just watching each other slowly separate?
Sounds like a great job but where did you say we had to go?

JCab747's picture
JCab747
November 27, 2017 - 5:31pm
rattraveller wrote:
One question if the void trip takes 3-15 seconds but 100 hours to figure, how do you make a quick exit from a system as they descibed in lore about starship battles? Is it watching the attacker coming at you, then a few shots fired at each other and then just watching each other slowly separate?


I suppose it would be like old fashioned sea combat, such as portrayed in the movie Master and Commander.

But your point about how does one make a quick exit brings one SF incident to mind.

When David "Zeb" Cook introduced the S'sessu as a optional race in Dragon magazine, his story had the frigate UPFS Hellscar misjumping while trying to escape two Sathar warships. The Hellscar, I believe, was supposed to have been heavily damaged before the S'sessu encountered it. ]

So, how did the Hellscar manage to make its escape? Did they do it in only 80 hours versus 100 hours? Oh, wait, the 100 hours is based on 1 G acceleration... well, I suppose the frigate wasn't at a dead stop when it started its long escape.

But, we go back to the fact it's just a game. Much like Star Fleet Battles when all you have to do in some scenarios is get off the edge of the map to make your escape no matter how fast you're travelling or how close your pursuer is.
Joe Cabadas

Shadow Shack's picture
Shadow Shack
November 27, 2017 - 10:36pm
JCab747 wrote:
When David "Zeb" Cook introduced the S'sessu as a optional race in Dragon magazine, his story had the frigate UPFS Hellscar misjumping while trying to escape two Sathar warships. The Hellscar, I believe, was supposed to have been heavily damaged before the S'sessu encountered it. ]

So, how did the Hellscar manage to make its escape? Did they do it in only 80 hours versus 100 hours? Oh, wait, the 100 hours is based on 1 G acceleration... well, I suppose the frigate wasn't at a dead stop when it started its long escape.

I'm not familiar with the Dragon article but I'll interject here.

At ADF:4 a UPF frigate can outaccelerate any sathar warship save for another frigate, so depending upon what the other two ships were all the frigate has to do is accelerate at that rate of 4 until it is well out of gunnery range, after that it can "slow down" to a rate of 3 or 2 or whatever the enemy ships top out at for as long as said ships are willing to vainly take chase, and then drop down to 1G if/when they give up.

Obviously the 'gator was trying to smoke the jump in that shortened time and as mentioned failed & misjumped.
No, I'm not overly fond of Zeb's Guide. Nor do I have any qualms in stating why. Tongue out

My SF website

jedion357's picture
jedion357
November 29, 2017 - 9:50am
Shadow Shack wrote:
JCab747 wrote:
When David "Zeb" Cook introduced the S'sessu as a optional race in Dragon magazine, his story had the frigate UPFS Hellscar misjumping while trying to escape two Sathar warships. The Hellscar, I believe, was supposed to have been heavily damaged before the S'sessu encountered it. ]

So, how did the Hellscar manage to make its escape? Did they do it in only 80 hours versus 100 hours? Oh, wait, the 100 hours is based on 1 G acceleration... well, I suppose the frigate wasn't at a dead stop when it started its long escape.

I'm not familiar with the Dragon article but I'll interject here.

At ADF:4 a UPF frigate can outaccelerate any sathar warship save for another frigate, so depending upon what the other two ships were all the frigate has to do is accelerate at that rate of 4 until it is well out of gunnery range, after that it can "slow down" to a rate of 3 or 2 or whatever the enemy ships top out at for as long as said ships are willing to vainly take chase, and then drop down to 1G if/when they give up.

Obviously the 'gator was trying to smoke the jump in that shortened time and as mentioned failed & misjumped.

Or we can imagine that for a limited combat with just a few ships they were using advanced damage rules and the UPF frigate had taken some ADF hits making its situation so dire as to require a smoked jump.
I might not be a dralasite, vrusk or yazirian but I do play one in Star Frontiers!

iggy's picture
iggy
November 29, 2017 - 1:03pm
A few points.

Nothing in the universe is sitting still.  Whether you are accelerating to jump velocity or docked in a station, all are in motion at all times with variations in velocity  (acceleration) due to gravitational interactions.  Doing astrogation before departure or after makes no difference. 

The more variables you add to calculations and simulations the exponentially longer they become.  This lends to the required use of computers to reduce the calculation times from months to days.  Think of the modern examples of times to render digital animation for movies, time to simulate nuclear explosions, time to plot NASA space ship trajectories.   We build super computers and render farms (aka budget super computers) to do this.  Astrogation is going to be many more variables than r, theta, phi.  This is going to include time, mass, change in mass, mass of each other object passed, velocity vector of each object passed (r, thete, phi, v), velocity vectors of stellar wind, velocity vectors of galactic wind, and maybe a few more know properties of the universe that I'm not thinking of.  Then add in a half dozen or more variables about the void.  Summing all this up you have a minimum of 33 variables for just one ship and the two stars it is traveling between, and ignoring and planets in each system.  If it takes 10 seconds to plot an airplane course, r, theta, phi, v, mass, and change in mass (6 variables), then we can estimate that 33 variables would be something of the magnitude of 10^(33-6)=1e+27 seconds.  That works out to be 3.17e+19 years.  So, astrogators are using computers and they are powerful computers and the calculations take a long time. In fact the times guessed at in the books are generous.
-iggy

JCab747's picture
JCab747
November 29, 2017 - 1:24pm
iggy wrote:
A few points.

Nothing in the universe is sitting still.  ... The more variables you add to calculations and simulations the exponentially longer they become.  ...  So, astrogators are using computers and they are powerful computers and the calculations take a long time. In fact the times guessed at in the books are generous.


Points well taken!
Joe Cabadas

KRingway's picture
KRingway
November 29, 2017 - 2:24pm
But then again, from the point of us on the Earth and with our present technology, this is how long we judge things might take. This needn't apply to SF. Their knowledge base is older and no doubt much wider.

rattraveller's picture
rattraveller
November 29, 2017 - 3:23pm
I agree. We can currently plot the course of planets, stars and galaxies without having to calculate their positions each time we try to find them in the night sky. SF astrogators would have all this knowledge at the ready and should be able to figure out the jump calcualtions with a hand calculator in less than 100 hours much less with a level 3 computer with a jump program.

Another game system uses a different method. A recent one I read about has beacons along the common jump routes which allow starships to plot their course pretty quickly. Going to a new system takes longer.
Sounds like a great job but where did you say we had to go?

JCab747's picture
JCab747
December 1, 2017 - 5:34pm
I don't know if this is a good solution to the discussion about the amount of time it takes an astrogator to calculate all the variables for a void jump, but here's an idea:

I've been using a variant of the Star Frontiers 2000 project, which is a conversion of Zebs skills into an Alpha Dawn-like hybrid system. I made a few more adjustments for my campaign.

While no one has gotten space ship skills yet, so I haven't play tested this out, the SF 2000 system created "Spacer" as a separate profession, where a character can purchase space ship skills with fewer XPs than regular characters, though it is more costly than normal skills...

I have it where if you want to learn Astrogation, you do learn all the regular Knight Hawks subskills -- which makes it more costly, but I couldn't see where someone who could Plot Interstellar Jumps won't also know how to Risk Jump or have enough sense or ability to Find Location without buying a separate skill...

Now, after that long-winded prelude:

For interstellar jumps, the normal plotting time is 10 hours per light year, minus 2 hours for each level of the Astrogation skill.

For example, a level 1 astrogator plotting an 8 light-year jump must spend 80 hours performing the calculations before the ship could make a Void jump. (8 LY x 10 hours - 2 hours x 1 for his Astrogation skill level). Meanwhile, a level 8 astrogator can make the same calculations in 64 hours
.

So, if the ship is still doing only a 1 G acceleration from a stop, it would take the 100 hours to get up to jump speed but the experienced astrogator gets a chance to rest and play cards down in the engine room with other members of the crew.

Yes, in the Zebs hybrid system there are 8 skill levels, not 6.

I think another option, at least for some of the major systems such as Prenglar, a ship captain might have the option of purchasing a pre-plotted jump route from the local space station, which probably has the massive level 6 super computer.
Joe Cabadas

jedion357's picture
jedion357
December 1, 2017 - 6:07pm
Sf 2000 is a nice expansion of Zebs but its fiddly and tough on new players, i felt like it has too many skills. 

I like the idea of a level 6 robotic brain number crunching a void jump, though. Its not cannon but interesting. 
I might not be a dralasite, vrusk or yazirian but I do play one in Star Frontiers!

TerlObar's picture
TerlObar
December 1, 2017 - 7:50pm
I'll post this again here although I've posted it elsewhere (and even wrote a book :-) ).  This is my personal interpretation and I think someone touched a bit on this in one of their comments.

I think the 10 hours per light year dosen't necessarily represent time spent continually doing calculations but that it does need to be done (at least mostly) while traveling.  The reason is that this is the time it takes to properly line the ship up on the right vector.  I see Void travel as a "straight" line shot.  Once you enter the Void, you are going to follow that path and it had better be the right one.  So a lot of that time is spent actually taking observations and making course adjustments to get the ship lined up properly before you enter the Void.  I see it working something like this:

Initial calculations: 1 hour/light year - This factors in the current position and relative motions of the two stars, the planet your starting from, the station your docked to, and the gravitational influences of all the other planets in both systems and the interstellar medium between you and your destination.  Plus things like your ship's engine characteristics (including quirks), and other factors.  This can be done before you head out but has to be computed for your intended departure time as some of those factors are always changing.  Miss your window and you have to recompute.

Start accelerating and lining up the ship: If you want to do the 10 hour/lyr total, this is 9 hrs/lyr.  This involves taking lots and lots of parallax measuresments of the stars to detrmine your absolute motion relative to them and canceling out any undesired motions from the stars planets and stations that you have to start and then maiking sure you are ponted at the proper point in space where you want to emerge.  The problem is that this is a really small target.

If you assume you are trying to hit a 4 AU radius sphere around your destination, and the destination is 1 lyr away, that target is only 26.1 arcseconds in diameter.  That's a little less then 1/60th the diameter of the full moon.  But the shortest jump (at least between inhabited systems) is 4 ly which makes that size 16 times smaller.  Or only 6 arcsec across.  For a 10 lyr jump, that target is only 2.6 arcsec across.  And at 10 ly, if you are off by 1 arc sec, you're off by 3 AU which will take you at least an extra 35-45 hours at 1%c to cover.  (Actually probably more as you have to change your velocity vector completely.)

How accurate of a line is that? Well if you are off by 1 arcsec, and you've traveled 1000 km, you are off line by only half a centimeter.  At 1 million kilometers, you still only off by 4.8 meters.  And you have to measure that by looking at your motion relative to the closer stars, the star your leaving , and the planets in the system.  And when you first start out you're moving slowly and it takes a long time to get those 1million km baselines (you probably need longer ones) to make the measures.

At the same time, you have to be monitoring your engine output so that you don't get imbalances (in a multi drive ship which is almost all of them) so that uneven thrust doesn't mess you up.  And if you get into a fight or have to dodge around something, you're pobably starting all over on the calculations and the lining everything up.  So the longer the jump the more accurate you need to be and the longer it takes to get eveything just right.  I acutally thing the total time would go up faster for longer jumps but a linear relation is easier.

So I don't see the astrogator sitting glued to the computer for the full 10 hours/lyr but at the same time they aren't going to be kicking back and drinking margaritas.  The computer can run the telescope and collect the data but the astrogator is going to be checking it and making judgement calls along the way.

"Traveling through the Void ain't like dusting crops, boy."


Ad Astra Per Ardua!
Webmaster - The Star Frontiers Network & this site
Founding Editor - The Frontier Explorer Magazine
Managing Editor - The Star Frontiersman Magazine

JCab747's picture
JCab747
December 1, 2017 - 9:44pm
jedion357 wrote:
Sf 2000 is a nice expansion of Zebs but its fiddly and tough on new players, i felt like it has too many skills.

jedion357 wrote:
I like the idea of a level 6 robotic brain number crunching a void jump, though. Its not cannon but interesting. 


Hence the reason I've been working on simplifying it by combining related skills and offering starting career examples -- bribing the characters to chose one of them by offering 10 skills for the cost of 8 with 2 XPs leftover for individual development.

But, I liked a lot of what the originators of SF 2000 tried to do.

jedion357 wrote:
I like the idea of a level 6 robotic brain number crunching a void jump, though. Its not cannon but interesting. 


Like your idea of robotic probes, which isn't "canon" according to Knight Hawks, it only makes sense that a dedicated level 6 computer, which supposedly has enough power to run a planet... it is a planet, right? ... should be able to handle space traffic control, with the appropriate fees that such a service would cost... Now what would be the appropriate fees?
Joe Cabadas

JCab747's picture
JCab747
December 1, 2017 - 9:47pm
TerlObar wrote:
I'll post this again here although I've posted it elsewhere (and even wrote a book :-) ).  ...

So I don't see the astrogator sitting glued to the computer for the full 10 hours/lyr but at the same time they aren't going to be kicking back and drinking margaritas.  The computer can run the telescope and collect the data but the astrogator is going to be checking it and making judgement calls along the way.

"Traveling through the Void ain't like dusting crops, boy."




No arguments against this logic from me.
Joe Cabadas

KRingway's picture
KRingway
December 2, 2017 - 2:07am
It still seems like an inordiante amount of time just to make one trip, especially when space travel has been around in the SF universe for quite some time and the fact that there are established routes. Even then, and with all of the variations involved, why a computer can't do all of this plotting etc instead has always seemed a bit strange to me.

When I was designing the rules for the 'Void Drive', one of the first changes I made was to introduce a new type of computer which had been designed specifically to reduce plotting times. There's no reason why this and it's software could not be put ino a robot pilot.

It still seems to me that potentially dangerous journeys such as those carried out by probes would favour having a robot pilot rather than a sentient being.

rattraveller's picture
rattraveller
December 2, 2017 - 6:06am
So if we go with the idea above. Well thought out and presented. It begs the question, what does the astrogator do once the jump is over? If they are calculating like crazy on the outward journey what is there to do once they get there? Finding a planet or space station, especially in an inhabited and well travelled system, should not be too hard.
Sounds like a great job but where did you say we had to go?

TerlObar's picture
TerlObar
December 2, 2017 - 10:17am
rattraveller wrote:
So if we go with the idea above. Well thought out and presented. It begs the question, what does the astrogator do once the jump is over? If they are calculating like crazy on the outward journey what is there to do once they get there? Finding a planet or space station, especially in an inhabited and well travelled system, should not be too hard.

If you're jumping to an inhabited system, then once the jump is over, the astrogator gets a bit to relax.  They will still be making routine navigational and positional checks but I figure a lot of that is simplified by in-system navigational aids.

For those rare times you are jumping to an unexplored system, there is no rest for the weary if you're trying to find planets and such in the system.  Exactly what happens will depend on how you decide to handle knowledge of unexplored systems but to give you an idea of the difficulty, check out the first image on the "Pale Blue Dot" page.  That dot in the picture is the earth as seen from the outer solar system (the red band is glare from the sun in the photograph).  When you first jump into a system, you are having to scan the entire sky for little specks like that and then filter out all the noise and find the ones that move.  It's easier with prior knowledge but it's still a lot of work to get exact positions.

However, that's fairly rare so most of the time the inward leg after the jump is the astrogator's time to rest up from all the effort expended prior to the jump.  At least that's my take on it.
Ad Astra Per Ardua!
Webmaster - The Star Frontiers Network & this site
Founding Editor - The Frontier Explorer Magazine
Managing Editor - The Star Frontiersman Magazine

JCab747's picture
JCab747
December 2, 2017 - 12:47pm
rattraveller wrote:
So if we go with the idea above. Well thought out and presented. It begs the question, what does the astrogator do once the jump is over? If they are calculating like crazy on the outward journey what is there to do once they get there? Finding a planet or space station, especially in an inhabited and well travelled system, should not be too hard.


Depending upon the type of ship, I'm sure that an astrogator, who should be a whiz with numbers, can be used in other capacities. Maybe he's/she's/it's the ship's paymaster or bookkeeper.

The engineer's aren't on the job all the time.

And, once you are in system, you still have to plot around any hazards such as known asteroids and comets, other ships, etc.

I would argue that a more experienced astrogator should be able to shave some time off of their calculations simply because they know what they're doing... "I've jumped into Prenglar 400 times so far and this planet has this orbit.."
Joe Cabadas

Shadow Shack's picture
Shadow Shack
December 2, 2017 - 7:42pm
rattraveller wrote:
It begs the question, what does the astrogator do once the jump is over? If they are calculating like crazy on the outward journey what is there to do once they get there? Finding a planet or space station, especially in an inhabited and well travelled system, should not be too hard.

The astrogator is the hardest working character (or characters, depending on the allowance of teams), so I have no problem with their down time on the other end of the trip. 
 
JCab747 wrote:
I would argue that a more experienced astrogator should be able to shave some time off of their calculations simply because they know what they're doing... "I've jumped into Prenglar 400 times so far and this planet has this orbit.."

I house rule this as well, shaving off plotting time per level.
No, I'm not overly fond of Zeb's Guide. Nor do I have any qualms in stating why. Tongue out

My SF website

KRingway's picture
KRingway
December 3, 2017 - 8:47am
TerlObar wrote:
For those rare times you are jumping to an unexplored system, there is no rest for the weary if you're trying to find planets and such in the system.  Exactly what happens will depend on how you decide to handle knowledge of unexplored systems but to give you an idea of the difficulty, check out the first image on the "Pale Blue Dot" page.  That dot in the picture is the earth as seen from the outer solar system (the red band is glare from the sun in the photograph).  When you first jump into a system, you are having to scan the entire sky for little specks like that and then filter out all the noise and find the ones that move.  It's easier with prior knowledge but it's still a lot of work to get exact positions.


One wonders if it's possible that the routes between systems are strung with beacons that transmit their position, local conditions and other data via subspace link. Maybe systems also have these in place. Perhaps when leaving known space, one takes a fix on the nearest beacon and then makes another fix on it (via subspace link) when your ship leaves the Void in an unknown system or part of space. That way you have some idea where you are relative to the last known point in your journey. Possibly this is also how mis-jumps can be rectified by trying to get a fix on one of these beacons.

TerlObar's picture
TerlObar
December 3, 2017 - 10:40am
I like the idea but the way subspace radios are defined in the game, they are a directional, beamed transmission.  So unless they were beaming at all the uninhabited systems, you wouldn't dected a signal. 
Ad Astra Per Ardua!
Webmaster - The Star Frontiers Network & this site
Founding Editor - The Frontier Explorer Magazine
Managing Editor - The Star Frontiersman Magazine

Shadow Shack's picture
Shadow Shack
December 3, 2017 - 7:26pm
Beacons are a good idea but it's just too easy for any spacer with an inkling for being nefarious to go tampering with one...or even more easily by simply using it as target practice.
No, I'm not overly fond of Zeb's Guide. Nor do I have any qualms in stating why. Tongue out

My SF website

rattraveller's picture
rattraveller
December 4, 2017 - 6:19am
Beacons aren't stop signs on Alabama back roads. What you are describing is the "money in the mattress" theory. Banks get hacked and robbed so best to keep all my money in my mattress.
Some factors to think of would be the size of the beacons and they would need to be pretty big. They will need to house multiple subspace transmitters to handle the traffic. Basing this on Clarion having a ship dock every 100 to 200 minutes. If those ships are needing 80 to 100 hours of prejump communications that is alot of ships communicating with the beacons.
The transmitters are going to need power. How big a power plant varies depending on other demands like defences and shielding and whether maintenance robots are included.
This does not go with manned beacons but some sort of visitation access would be needed for updates and repairs robots could not make.


Sounds like a great job but where did you say we had to go?